Cómo diseñar para lectores de pantalla

It’s easy to think about a layout as being a primarily visual concern. The header goes up top, the sidebar is over here, the call to action is in an overlay on top of the content (just kidding). Grids, borders, spacing and color all portray valuable visual data, but if these hints to the structure of a page are only visible, some users may find your content unintelligible.
You can experience this first hand if you try using a screen reader on the web. When I fired up VoiceOver on my Mac and took it out for a test drive, I realized that to a screen reader user, a lot pages are just a big heap of ‘content’, missing helpful organizational cues. 
The experience can be kind of like listening to a long rambling story without any indication to what details are important or related to the main thread of the story. Halfway through the story, you aren’t sure whether it’s worth it to keep listening because you don’t know if you’ll even find what it is you’re looking for. In the context of a website, your screen reader might be halfway through reading you a list of 50 sidebar links when you start wondering if there is any valuable content on the site at all.
Experiences like this are caused by websites that are built with layouts that are only visual. Ideally, however, our visual layouts should point to an underlying organizational model of our content. They should be visual indicators for a conceptual model. The visual indicators are just one way of revealing this model. The Web Accessibility Initiative’s ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications) project provides alternative indicators to users who may need them. 
I’ll walk through how to make use of these indicators to make a simple web page easy to use, navigate and read for users of assistive technology. All the example code is available on github.

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